Plane picking up Philippine typhoon victim donations in Chicago - FOX 32 News Chicago

Plane picking up Philippine typhoon victim donations in Chicago

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A C130 Cargo Plane will be landing in Chicago to pick up a container bound for the Red Cross in the Philippines.

Donations will be accepted at the Rizal Center Chicago, located at 1332 W. Irving Park Road, near Clark Street.

DEADLINE: Please make your donations by 8 p.m. on WEDNESDAY.

GUIDELINES:

DO NOT PACK NOODLES, RICE OR ANYTHING THAT NEEDS WATER - There is no water and electricity so it is impossible to cook this kind of food. Stick to bread, canned goods that are ready-to-eat and can be opened WITHOUT THE NEED FOR A CAN OPENER.

PACK MEDICINE - most especially basic medicine (biogesic, bioflu, robitussin etc). Also if possible, include medicine for surface wounds as many have been wounded because of the debris and fallen rooftops.

PACK AT LEAST ONE BOTTLE OF WATER - People are raging for water (some have even become violent just for water). There is no source of water at all in any part of Tacloban.

PACK CANDLES AND MATCHES - there will be no electricity for a minimum of two months so all people will need these.

ENCOURAGE YOUR RESPECTIVE GROUP/ORGANIZATION TO DONATE BODYBAGS - Bodies are lying around the roads within the city and some of the places have already been filled up with bodies.

Loyola University Health System pediatric critical care physician Dr. David Ubogy joined FOX 32 News at Noon on Tuesday to explain what Super Typhoon Haiyan victims are facing in the Philippines in the aftermath of the storm.

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TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) - Mobs overran a rice warehouse on the island worst hit by the Philippine typhoon, setting off a wall collapse that killed eight people and carting off thousands of sacks of the grain, while security forces Wednesday exchanged gunfire with an armed gang.

The incidents in or close to the storm-ravaged city hosting international relief efforts add to concerns about the slow pace of aid distribution and that parts of the disaster zone are descending into chaos.

Five long days after Typhoon Haiyan wasted the eastern seaboard of the Philippines, the cogs of what promises to be a massive international aid effort are beginning to turn, but not quickly enough for the some 600,000 people displaced, many of them homeless, hungry and thirsty.

"There's a bit of a logjam to be absolutely honest getting stuff in here," said U.N. staffer Sebastian Rhodes Stampa against the roar of a C-130 transport plane landing behind him at the airstrip in Tacloban, one of the hardest-hit cities.

"It's almost all in country - either in Manila or in Cebu, but it's not here. We're going to have a real challenge with logistics in terms of getting things out of here, into town, out of town, into the other areas," he said. "The reason for that essentially is that there are no trucks, the roads are all closed."

Planes, ships and trucks were all on their way to the region, loaded with generators, water purifying kits and emergency lights - vital equipment needed to sustain a major relief mission. Airports were reopening in the region, and the U.S. military said it was installing equipment to allow the damaged Tacloban aiport to operate 24-7.

Tacloban's mayor, Alfred Romualdez, urged residents to flee the city because local authorities were having trouble providing food and water and maintaining order, The New York Times reported. He said the city was in desperate need of trucks to distribute relief shipments that were accumulating at the city's airport as well as equipment to pull decaying corpses from the rubble.

Eight people were crushed to death when the mob stormed a rice warehouse around 24 kilometers (15 miles) from Tacloban on Tuesday and carried off thousands of sacks of grain, according to National Food Authority spokesman Rex Estoperez.

On Wednesday, gunfire broke out close to the city's San Juanico bridge on Wednesday between security forces and armed men, but the circumstances were unclear, according to footage on local TV.

Since the storm, people have broken into homes, malls and garages, where they have stripped the shelves of food, water and other goods. Authorities have struggled to stop the looting. There have been unconfirmed reports of armed gangs of robbers operating in a systematic manner.

An 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew was in place across the region. Despite incidents, police said the situation was improving.

"We have restored order," said Carmelo Espina Valmoria, director of the Philippine National Police special action force. "There has been looting for the last three days, but the situation has stabilized."

The death toll rose to 2,275, according a national tally kept by the disaster agency. That figure is expected to rise, perhaps significantly, when accurate information is collected from the entirety of the disaster zone, which spreads over a wide swath of the eastern and central Philippines but appears to be concentrated on two main islands, Leyte and Samar.

The congressman for Eastern Samar province, a coastal region that bore the full force of the storm, said 211 had been killed there and 45 were missing. He said some villages have been wiped out, with practically no structures standing. In one town, bodies remain lying on the road because help has not come to retrieve or bury them. Other towns have conducted mass burials.

"The situation there was horrible," Ben Evardone told a local television station. "Some communities disappeared, entire villages were wiped out. They were shouting 'food, food, food!' when they saw me."

U.S. Brig Gen. Paul Kennedy promised a response akin to the widely praised U.S. military one after the 2004 Asian tsunami, when fleets of helicopters dropped water and food to hundreds of isolated communities along the coast.

"You are not just going to see Marines and a few planes and some helicopters," Kennedy said. "You will see the entire Pacific Command respond to this crisis."

A Norwegian ship carrying supplies left from Manila, while an Australian air force transport plane took off from Canberra carrying a medical team. British and American navy vessels are also en route to the region.

At the Tacloban airport, makeshift clinics have been set up and thousands of people were waiting for a flight out. A doctor said supplies of antibiotics and anesthetics arrived Tuesday for the first time.

"Until then, patients had to endure the pain," said Dr. Victoriano Sambale.

Relief officials said comparing the pace of this operation to those in past disasters was largely pointless because each posed unique challenges.

In Indonesia's Aceh, the worst-hit region by the 2004 tsunami, relief hubs were easier to set up than in Tacloban. The main airport there was functioning 24-7 within a couple of days of the disaster. While devastation in much of the city of Banda Aceh was total, large inland parts of the city were undamaged, providing a base for aid operations and temporary accommodation for the homeless.

Here are more ways to help:

UNITED NATIONS WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME

The United Nations World Food Program said it has allocated $2 million for the disaster response and officials joined an assessment mission to survey damage in Leyte and Samar provinces.

WFP said it will send more than 40 tons of high energy biscuits and work with the Filipino government to help with logistics and emergency communications systems.

It asks for donations at www.wfpusa.org or by texting the word AID to 27722 to instantly donate $10.

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UNICEF

UNICEF said its staff in the Philippines is being repositioned to help in relief efforts and 66 tons of emergency supplies are being sent from Copenhagen. An airlift set to arrive on Tuesday will include water purification systems, storage equipment and sanitation supplies.

Donations can be made to UNICEF at unicef.org/support.

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RED CROSS

The American Red Cross said it has deployed two people to assist with assessments in the Philippines and activated its family tracing services. It asked those who want to support relief efforts to mail a check to their local American Red Cross chapter, with "Philippines Typhoons and Flood" in the memo line.

Go to redcross.org for local chapter information or redcross.org.ph to donate directly to the Philippine Red Cross.

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SALVATION ARMY

All disaster donations will be used for relief efforts and "to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors."

Text TYPHOON to 80888 to donate $10 or give online.

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CATHOLIC RELIEF SERVICES

Catholic Relief Services is accepting donations on its website emergencies.crs.org as it begins moving supplies and staff to respond to the typhoon.

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WORLD VISION

World Vision said it is putting together resources to assist 1.2 million people, including food, hygiene kits, emergency shelter and protection.

It asked for one-time donations to be made at worldvision.org.

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AMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee has begun collecting donations for relief efforts.

To contribute, go to www.jdc.org or call 212-687-6200.

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AMERICAN JEWISH WORLD SERVICE

American Jewish World Service is collecting money to provide directly to local groups in the Philippines.

To donate, go to http://www.ajws.org.

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MERCY CORPS

Mercy Corps said it has launched emergency response efforts to provide food, water, shelter and basic supplies to typhoon survivors.

To contribute, go to www.mercycorps.org/typhoon or call (800) 292-3355.

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AMERICARES

AmeriCares is preparing to deploy an emergency response team to the Philippines.

To donate go to http://americares.org or call (800) 486-4357.

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SHELTERBOX

The Huffington Post reports ShelterBox provides families with a survival kit that includes a tent and other essential items while they are displaced or homeless. Learn more online.

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DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS

Doctors Without Borders said it has 15 members in Cebu city and will send an additional 50 people in the next few days. It said it also is sending 329 tons of medical and relief supplies on three cargo planes.

To donate, go to www.doctorswithoutborders.org/donate.

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LUTHERAN WORLD RELIEF

Lutheran World Relief said it has deployed its local staff to stricken areas and is appealing for $2.5 million to aid its recovery effort.

To donate, go to http://lwr.org/donate/.

 

Foreign governments and agencies have announced a major relief effort to help victims of the Philippine typhoon. Here are some of the pledges they have made:

UNITED NATIONS

U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos has released $25 million from the U.N.'s emergency relief fund to provide emergency food assistance, supply emergency shelter materials and household items, assist with the provision of emergency health services, safe water supplies and sanitation facilities. The funding will also be used for critical protection, nutrition and emergency activities, the U.N. humanitarian office said.

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INTERNATIONAL RESCUE COMMITTEE

The International Rescue Committee has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal. The IRC will work to determine which of its areas of expertise - from water and sanitation to education - are most needed.

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UNITED STATES

The United States has pledged $20 million in immediate aid and has ordered the aircraft carrier USS George Washington to the sail to the Philippines to provide assistance in the wake of the typhoon. It was expected to arrive in about two days. Officials from the U.S. Agency for International Development are deployed around the country to monitor the damage.

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BRITAIN

The United Kingdom is deploying a Royal Navy warship and donating a total of 10 million pounds' (roughly $16 million) worth of humanitarian assistance in aid of the victims of the typhoon, British Prime Minister David Cameron said.

Britain will also deploy Royal Air Force military transport aircraft in aid of recovery efforts, earmarking at least one C-17 cargo plane to move humanitarian aid and large equipment.

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AUSTRALIA

Australia announced assistance of 10 million Australian dollars ($9.4 million). That includes the deployment of an emergency medical team, aid to the U.N. Flash Appeal and aid to Australian non-governmental organizations for immediate life-saving assistance.

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JAPAN

Japan will donate $10 million to the Philippines and has sent a 25-member relief team of mostly medical staff.

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CANADA

Canada has promised to donate up to $5 million in support of humanitarian organizations helping typhoon victims. In addition, the government pledged to match every dollar donated by individual Canadians to registered Canadian charities for typhoon relief.

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CHINA

China said it was pledging an initial $200,000, including $100,000 from the government and another $100,000 from the Chinese Red Cross while assessing what the full needs would be.

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TAIWAN

Taiwan said it will send $200,000 in aid to help with relief efforts.

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ISRAEL

Israel plans to set up a field hospital near the disaster area that is likely to focus on trauma care. Israel has sent a team of six medical and logistics experts to study the best location to erect it.

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HSBC

HSBC Group is donating over $1 million toward victims of the typhoon and is activating a bank-wide drive to raise funds from its employees globally.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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