Man wanted in Poland for reckless homicide deported - FOX 32 News Chicago

Man wanted in Poland for reckless homicide deported

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CHICAGO (Sun-Times Media Wire) -

A northwest suburban man living in the United States illegally for more than 10 years was deported Monday to Poland, where he is wanted for killing a pedestrian while driving recklessly 10 years ago.

Bartosz Sikorski, 32, of Harwood Heights, is wanted in Poland on reckless homicide charges, according to a release from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He was allegedly speeding when he fatally struck a woman on June 8, 2002.

Sikorski fled to the United States in August 2002 after receiving a visitor's visa and remained in the country illegally after it expired in June 2003, ICE said.

Sikorski was convicted of felony theft by deception in Cook County in March 2007, and in November 2009, ICE began deportation proceedings while Sikorski was still in jail. But on March 24, 2010, a federal immigration judge ordered Sikorski to voluntarily leave the county by April 22, 2010, but he did not leave and was arrested again in April 2012, according to ICE.

ICE officers turned him over to Harwood Heights police, who had issued a warrant, and he was convicted May 24 of a felony for illegally using an account number. He was released from Cook County Jail on June 5, and ICE learned from the FBI in August that he was wanted in Poland, the release said.

Sikorski has remained in ICE custody since being arrested Oct. 4 outside Cook County Jail when he was released on the local charges. He was deported from Chicago on Monday and was placed in the custody of authorities in Warsaw, Poland on Tuesday, ICE said.

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